Recipes

Snack time! Gluten free lentil “pita” chips (vegan)

No Comments 10 September 2014

low histamine recipes crackers

I’ve got snacking on the brain. Not actual in between meals snacking, but finger foods that are super quick to prepare and store easily for days when I’m eating on the run.

These lentil pita chips, like all my recipes, are highly customisable. When I first made these, I literally just dumped an indeterminate amount of lentil flour, an assortment of antihistamine and anti-inflammatory herbs and some olive oil into the blender and dove straight for the oven with barely a coherent plan in mind.

I had a mutiny on my hands see. We were in the south of France to help good friend’s brother get his health on track, when I broke the news that even my delicious gluten free, fruit sweetened, antihistamine and anti-inflammatory muffins should not be consumed daily when dealing with pre-diabtetes, a heart condition and excess weight.

Sign up to my mailing list to score your copy of the upcoming high nutrient, gluten free, mini muffin book – that’s only going out to all you lovely subscribers.

So, as you can imagine, coming up with a healthy, tasty treat, in a hurry, seemed like a great idea. I’m happy to say they were devoured by the whole family, not just those on my “special” diet. And this raises a point – the anti-diet is in fact something I feel might be of benefit not only to those with histamine intolerance/mast cell disorders, but also those with generally inflammatory conditions – like cardiac patients. I share a number of studies on the link between mast cells/histamine and cardiac problems, including heart attack in the Low Histamine Lifestyle 101 Book, but you can find the same information by googling “histamine or mast cells + cardiac”. At the very least, going super duper high nutrient is better than the usual fare people indulge in (I simply call it “garbage”), but please consult with your doctor before making any dietary changes of course. 

While I have you here – don’t be afraid to experiment. When I first started blogging I decided not to specify exact amounts for herbs, garlic and onion, which is because I eat for health, so stuff as much in there as I can, and I don’t pretend to be a Michelin starred chef, or even an actual chef, but rather a layperson who is spreading the gospel that healthy low histamine doesn’t mean exiling your taste buds to a culinary Siberia. But people kept freaking out, and so now I do.

Please understand: ALL recipes are there to be messed with (whether my own or that of others) and it’s important to be ready for failure and have a sense of humour about it. I do know it can get expensive when we’re dealing with items that aren’t run of the mill, so use your best judgement of course. It is however important to understand the fundamentals of flavour and balance in recipes (a number of great books out there), so that you can really freestyle it. I’m a big lover of learning it all the right way just so that I can tear it all down and create something truly fabulous that’ll make my senses trill.

This recipe (as all the others in my cookbooks) is packed with incredible healing ingredients:

Antihistamine: quercetin rich onion, garlic, coriander, thyme, basil [1].

Anti-inflammatory: thyme, onion, garlic, coriander, thyme, basil, olive oil [2].

These crackers are da BOMB when served with any of the antihistamine and anti-inflamatory rich soups in the all liquid Anti-Detox.

Lentil crackers

Ingredients:

2 cups lentil flour
water (about 1/4 – 1/2 cup, depending on desired thickness)
1/2 onion
1 clove garlic
4 tbsp olive oil
6 tbsp thyme leaves (or to taste)
handful finely chopped basil
handufl finely chopped coriander

optional: salt and pepper

Directions:

Pre-heat oven to 180C/250F. 

Add the flour, onion, garlic, olive oil, thyme, basil and coriander into a food processor, drizzle in some water and then work lightly till a ball of dough forms. 

If you have oxalate issues, pre-soak the lentil flour in the water for at least a few hours. This has been shown to lower oxalate levels

Spoon onto a pre-oiled baking tray and use a knife to score into triangles. 

If your mixture is too liquidy, don’t panic, just bake for at least 10 minutes, then score with a knife and return to the oven. 

Bake for about  15-20 minutes (depending on thickness) and then flip over for another 15-20. Remove from oven, break apart and serve with your choice of dip.

You’ll find a collection of all liquid high nutrient antihistamine and anti-inflammatory rich recipes for days when my histamine bucket overflowed in the new Anti-Detox book

The Anti-cookbook, while it doesn’t treat any conditions, due to its high nutrient, antihistamine and anti-inflammatory ingredients, has been instrumental in helping me feed myself on a limited diet. It features a six page list of antihistamine and anti-inflammatory foods. It comes in regular and Paleo. 

The Low Oxalate Cookbook features antihistamine and anti-inflammatory rich recipes. 

Don’t miss the Low Histamine Beauty Survival Guide for non-toxic beauty tips, the skinny on histamine releasing (mast cell degranulating) beauty ingredients, antihistamine and anti-inflammatory beauty alternatives and the top brands natural brands I’ve found.

Take a peek at my other low histamine and antihistamine cookbooks for more high nutrient recipes.

If you’ve found this information useful I’d appreciate your support (at no extra cost to you!) – please check out my online store for your health foods, supplements, kitchen items and beauty product purchases. Affiliate sales through my online store go towards maintaining the website, funding travel to interviews and purchasing all the lovely foods for my free online recipes. You’ll find these items in the “Shop with us” drop down menu on my homepage.  

Please don’t forget antihistamine, pain killing foods can still hurt us, so please always check with your doctor before adding new foods to your diet. 

———————REFERENCES———————

[1 + 2] Yasmina Ykelenstam, The Anti-Cookbook. 2012.

Recipes

Antihistamine rich artichoke Soup

No Comments 22 July 2014

antihistamine artichoke soup

As you may have heard, I recently released the Anti-Detox, a new book of high nutrient antihistamine and anti-inflammatory rich all liquid recipes for those days when when I was feeling my histamine bucket gearing up to splurge all over the place.

This is a recipe I really wish had gone in there, but the wonderful chef Edward O’Neill (of The Naked Radish) and I just met out here in France, coming up with this recipe for a super healthy themed lunch, and hey, now you’re getting it for free!

And looking for the upside is pretty much what this blog has been about since its inception. “Condemned” to the weirdest diet I had ever heard of (and believe me, there have been some doozies, more on that in the Anti-Detox book) in 2010, I pretty much went to pieces when I realised I’d have to cut out all my favourite foods, but at the same time my type A, controlling personality breathed a massive sigh of relief at the thought there was a way to take charge of my insanely frightening health decline of the previous years.

And there really was. I’m so grateful that I was initially diagnosed with histamine intolerance and told the only treatment was diet, because once I got my mast cell activation diagnosis, you better believe those folks thought I was completely barking mad when I told them I was managing my symptoms through lifestyle changes alone (thank you very much) and that I had no intention of taking multiple meds so I may once again enjoy “real” food. The items under discussion: pizza, pasta, coca cola. It was my turn to look at them as if they’d lost the plot, telling them I no longer considered said items to be “food”.

Which brings me to the point of today’s post (other than sharing a delicious healing recipe with you of course!): gratitude.

I can honestly say that gratitude is something that had been missing from my vocabulary.

While I certainly knew many people far better off than me, I definitely led a very privileged life. The wheel of fortune spun fast and hard for my mother, causing many upheavals and instability, but there was never a shortage of shopping trips, tech gadgets and trips around the world when I was growing up. Flying around in private jets, beautiful boats, champagne and all that jazz were pretty much the norm. And yet, my mother and her friends often lamented my completely blasé attitude (direct quote heard many times) towards this bounty. Eventually unable to process why I couldn’t enjoy any of it, I escaped, cutting contact with all my friends and everything associated with my home town – running off to work 16-20 hour days as a journalist, grounded by the horror of “reality” around me.

But this entitled attitude followed me into my work life and more frighteningly into my health struggles. I believed that good health was my god given right and that I had every reason to scowl my way through life because I was shortchanged.

Pouting, crying, railing against my misfortune in not being able to enjoy the very things I had rejected decades before, I fed the toxicity I was sure I had left behind in my home town. But of course, in leaving home I still had not addressed the root of my malaise: my inability to give thanks and my gratitude to the universe, my mother and all my wonderful friends who scratched their heads in bewilderment the day I tossed them aside with as much ceremony as the kleenex I used to violently empty my inflamed sinus passages into.

So it’s time to reflect on what’s going into my gratitude diary tonight:

I am grateful for having found all you amazing people who have allowed me into your lives, inspiring me to continue my research and blogging, in addition to supporting my work so that I can actually feed myself while I do so!

I am grateful for having experienced extreme adversity in life, for me at least, it was a necessary part of the learning process.

I am grateful to this illness for having taught me how much I value being alive (there was a time I craved oblivion) and for forcing me to become the absolute healthiest I have been in my entire life.

I am grateful for all the wonderful people who have come into my life now that I am ready for them.

I am grateful to my (not so extended family) P&RS, for their tireless work in helping me understand that I am a human being of value who deserves to be treated as such, and for the latest addition to their brood, who I can’t wait to meet.

I am grateful to my mother, she did the absolute best she could and I’m very thankful it was more than enough to raise me as an (eventually) grounded person with an incredible toolkit that made me into a successful journalist.

I am grateful to HM for being my surrogate mom, best friend, cousin, confessional priest, who, even when I was at my absolute lowest in life, never made me feel like I was.

I am grateful to B for more than I can adequately express in words. I think I have tried in a couple of letters, but just in case I haven’t: thank you for providing me a haven of healing in the care of one of the most enlightened and inspiring beings I have known. I have learned more about myself from our talks in the last few weeks, than in a lifetime of searching for answers. I’m sure you’ll be getting more gratitude letters from me in the near future…

And I am of course very grateful to this healing soup and all others that have allowed me to regain control of my health.

Now, before we dive into the recipe du jour, I’d like you to make me a promise: you’ll get yourself a nifty little diary to keep at your bedside, and fill it with at least five things your grateful for, nightly. Why? Gratitude has been shown to lower inflammation, boost quality of life and increase happiness [1]. Not bad for something that can be practiced in as little as a few minutes a day, right?

Antihistamine and anti-inflammatory rich artichoke soup

Nutritional breakdown:

Antihistamine: artichokes, onion, garlic, broccoli, thyme, basil, chives.

Anti-inflammatory: artichokes, onion, almonds, coconut, garlic, lemons, broccoli, mushrooms, thyme, olive oil, chives, basil.

Ingredients:

6 large artichokes
1 large brown onion
1/2 cup almond/coconut milk
1/2 cup artichoke water
3 cloves garlic
2 lemons cut in half
1 cup broccoli juicing leftovers (or chopped broccoli)
1 cup mushrooms (optional, some believe them to be high histamine – you can use 1/2 cup chopped asparagus or more broccoli)
handful thyme
olive oil

garnish
very finely chopped chives 

drizzle
1/4 cup olive oil
1/2 cup basil
1/2 clove garlic
squeeze lemon juice

Directions:

Clean the artichoke by peeling off the leaves and furry bit, till you’re left with just the hearts.

Place in a pot with the lemons and then pour in enough water to cover. 

Bring to the boil then simmer for 30 minutes. 

Sauté the garlic, onions, mushrooms (if using), broccoli juicing leftovers and thyme in a little olive oil till soft. 

Blend with the almond/coconut milk, half a cup of the artichoke water and the veggies. 

Garnish with chives and drizzle. 

You’ll find a collection of all liquid high nutrient antihistamine and anti-inflammatory rich recipes for days when my histamine bucket overflowed in the new Anti-Detox book

The Anti-cookbook, while it doesn’t treat any conditions, due to its high nutrient, antihistamine and anti-inflammatory ingredients, has been instrumental in helping me feed myself on a limited diet. It features a six page list of antihistamine and anti-inflammatory foods. It comes in regular and Paleo. 

The Low Oxalate Cookbook features antihistamine and anti-inflammatory rich recipes. 

Don’t miss the Low Histamine Beauty Survival Guide for non-toxic beauty tips, the skinny on histamine releasing (mast cell degranulating) beauty ingredients, antihistamine and anti-inflammatory beauty alternatives and the top brands natural brands I’ve found.

Take a peek at my other low histamine and antihistamine cookbooks for more high nutrient recipes.

If you’ve found this information useful I’d appreciate your support (at no extra cost to you!) – please check out my online store for your health foods, supplements, kitchen items and beauty product purchases. Affiliate sales through my online store go towards maintaining the website, funding travel to interviews and purchasing all the lovely foods for my free online recipes. You’ll find these items in the “Shop with us” drop down menu on my homepage.  

Please don’t forget antihistamine, pain killing foods can still hurt us, so please always check with your doctor before adding new foods to your diet. 

————–REFERENCES————–

[1] http://www.sfgate.com/health/article/Berkeley-center-funds-gratitude-research-4091181.php

Recipes

The Anti-Detox

No Comments 09 July 2014

antidetox

I’m super duper excited to share that the Anti-Detox un-cook (e)book is available in my online store

This is a seven day collection of highly antihistamine and anti-inflammatory juices, smoothies, or a combination of both, which I have dubbed “jui-cies”, and delicious soups I have used to mediate histamine-induced inflammation. I can’t claim they’ll do the same for you, but at the very least, you’ll be getting a WHOPPING dose of nutrients that are known to bring down inflammation and stabilise mast cells (so they’ll hopefully stop dumping histamine and other inflammatory mediators into the body). 

There are times in life where we just need to kill the inflammation, be it histamine induced, or caused by any of the other inflammation spawning elements released from mast cells when the body is having a bit of a meltdown. I consider this book to be an inflammation busting cleanse, that just also happens to be low histamine as well.

Why liquid? Dr. Fuhrman (my nutritional hero) points out that liquids put less stress on the digestive tract as well as requiring less enzymes to be processed. It’s also what so many of you have written in to request!

Why is this the Anti-Detox? Because to me, what we put into the diet is FAR more important than whatever we take out of it. These recipes were created to nourish the body rather than simply deprive it of histamine intake.

The book serves up daily:

An antihistamine/mast cell stabilsing natural tea

x2 juices/smoothies/jui-cies

A super duper high nutrient soup

Information on why to cleanse, what toxic hunger is, a list of antihistamine, anti-inflammatory and mast cell stabilsing herbs and supplements, and whether water fasting is superior to juicing for beating histamine-induced inflammation.

As with the Anti-Cookbook, nothing in this book is here without purpose. Every single ingredient here is antihistamine and/or anti-inflammatory.

I’ve included lower oxalate options for the recipes. 

This book is not Paleo. 

As with all my recipes, please be aware that antihistamine and anti-inflammatory ingredients can still hurt us, so I respectfully ask that you show your doctor/medical practitioner/faith healer/shaman the book before trying any of the recipes. 

theantidetoxcover

The Anti-cookbook, while it doesn’t treat any conditions, due to its high nutrient, antihistamine and anti-inflammatory ingredients, has been instrumental in helping me feed myself on a limited diet. It features a six page list of antihistamine and anti-inflammatory foods. It comes in regular and Paleo. 

The Low Oxalate Cookbook features antihistamine and anti-inflammatory rich recipes. 

Don’t miss the Low Histamine Beauty Survival Guide for non-toxic beauty tips, the skinny on histamine releasing (mast cell degranulating) beauty ingredients, antihistamine and anti-inflammatory beauty alternatives and the top brands natural brands I’ve found.

Take a peek at my other low histamine and antihistamine cookbooks for more high nutrient recipes.

If you’ve found this information useful I’d appreciate your support (at no extra cost to you!) – please check out my online store for your health foods, supplements, kitchen items and beauty product purchases. Affiliate sales through my online store go towards maintaining the website, funding travel to interviews and purchasing all the lovely foods for my free online recipes. You’ll find these items in the “Shop with us” drop down menu on my homepage.  

Please don’t forget antihistamine, pain killing foods can still hurt us, so please always check with your doctor before adding new foods to your diet. 

Recipes

Gluten free blueberry muffins (with vegan option)

No Comments 26 June 2014

gluten low histamine free blueberry muffins

The muffin muse is with me – I’ve come up with just under five different muffin recipes in the last two weeks. It’s challenging figuring out how to stuff something so inherently unhealthy full of nutrients, while keeping the fat content down. Or in my case, keep it up.

No, not for me of course, but rather for a friend I’m helping fatten up! I’m working on variations of these suitable for my purposes, ie not to gain a ton of freaking weight.

Because, while it’s true that I’m working out a minimum of five days a week: x3 days 1hr weight training & x2 days 30-45 mins cardio, plus walking up to three hours daily in 30C heat, I still want to watch my caloric intake. More on exercise in my next post – I’m just super excited at how little time it has taken to retrain my mast cells in that regard.

If you’ve been reading my blog for a while, you’ll know that my goal is to make high nutrient antihistamine and anti-inflammatory rich foods that will help the body heal, rather than simply eliminating the histamine that may be causing allergy-like symptoms including: flushing, rashes, hives, migraine, dizziness, coughing etc. In my case, eliminating histamine by embracing the “low histamine diet” meant I was still eating a bunch of crap rather than examining my diet objectively. I mean how was my body to heal if I was only feeding it boiled potatoes, lamb, beef, lettuce and rice? It just wasn’t is the honest answer.

It took just a year of a high nutrient antihistamine and anti-inflammatory rich diet to help me heal. I’m now on what I call a histamine-balanced diet, the upside of which is that my body gets all the cancer-fighting benefits of the higher histamine foods and my taste buds stay engaged, meaning I still have the will to nourish myself, unlike the years I spent fearing/hating food and starving myself towards an early grave.

What I mean by an antihistamine and anti-inflammatory diet: a high nutrient diet, similar to the anti-inflammaotry one successfully employed by thousands/hundreds of thousands of followers of Dr Fuhrman’s diet, but with the addition of quercetin, luteolin and rutin rich foods. These bioflavonoids have been proven to stabilise mast cells [1], thereby preventing histamine release in the body. I believe doing that ha allowed me to ingest more of the excellent health building higher histamine foods I so craved.

So here’s my healthy, antihistamine and anti-inflammatory rich muffin recipe…

Recipe substitutions

You can make these lovely muffins vegan by substituting the eggs with flax or chia eggs.

The sweetener situation is totally fluid, so if you prefer to use whole dates, please do go ahead. I would advise soaking them a little bit and then blending with the coconut and other liquid ingredients.

You can use any fruit instead of blueberries – I would advise something a little tart that also liquidises during baking.

You can replace the coconut butter with pureed apple.

The seeds are totally optional – I use them for an omega 3 fatty acid boost.

Feel free to leave out the ginger. In fact, leave out the ginger for the first go, then decide if you’d like some.

I made another batch of these today but I swapped out half of the tapioca for pea protein (helping to build muscle).

Nutritional highlights

Antihistamine ingredients: blueberries, ginger, flax seeds.

Anti-inflammaotry ingredients: sorghum, duck eggs, coconut, dates, ginger, flax seeds, chia seeds.

More on that in the Anti-Cookbook – along with six pages of antihistamine and anti-inflamamatory foods I regularly eat.

Gluten free blueberry muffins

Prep Time: 10mins | Cook Time: 30min | Difficulty: Easy

Ingredients:

1 cup sorghum flour
1/2 cup tapioca
3 eggs/2 duck eggs or three flax/chia “eggs” here’s a great link on how to make them
1 cup blueberries
1/3 cup coconut butter (ie whole coconut in butter form, like almond butter, not just coconut fat. Can substitute with apple puree for a lower calorie option)
1/2 cup date syrup/coconut nectar or your choice of liquid sweetener
1/4 cup coconut or date sugar (optional, just for a bit of texture)
2 tbsp grated ginger (optional)
4 tbsp flax seed
4 tbsp chia seed

Directions:

Pre-heat oven to 180C/350F.

Combine the flours and seeds. In another bowl mix the coconut butter, date syrup, sugar, ginger and blueberries. 

Tip the liquid into the flour and combine by hand.

Place muffin cups into a muffin tray, evenly spoon the mixture into them.

Bake at 180C for 20-35 minutes, depending on oven.  

The Anti-cookbook, while it doesn’t treat any conditions, due to its high nutrient, antihistamine and anti-inflammatory ingredients, has been instrumental in helping me feed myself on a limited diet. It features a six page list of antihistamine and anti-inflammatory foods. It comes in regular and Paleo. 

The Low Oxalate Cookbook features antihistamine and anti-inflammatory rich recipes. 

Don’t miss the Low Histamine Beauty Survival Guide for non-toxic beauty tips, the skinny on histamine releasing (mast cell degranulating) beauty ingredients, antihistamine and anti-inflammatory beauty alternatives and the top brands natural brands I’ve found.

Take a peek at my other low histamine and antihistamine cookbooks for more high nutrient recipes.

If you’ve found this information useful I’d appreciate your support (at no extra cost to you!) – please check out my online store for your health foods, supplements, kitchen items and beauty product purchases. Affiliate sales through my online store go towards maintaining the website, funding travel to interviews and purchasing all the lovely foods for my free online recipes. You’ll find these items in the “Shop with us” drop down menu on my homepage.  

Please don’t forget antihistamine, pain killing foods can still hurt us, so please always check with your doctor before adding new foods to your diet. 

——————-REFERENCES—————–

[1] http://mastcellmaster.com

Recipes

Summertime white gazpacho soup

No Comments 12 June 2014

low histamine recipes white gazpacho

It’s coming up on that time of year where my desire to spend all day in the kitchen pretty much flies out the window. It’s especially hard to justify it here in Spain, where I’ve decided to settle for a little while. It’s been a long, long year, full of highs like being quoted in The Times newspaper in the UK, mentioned in the Huffington Post by a dear friend, but also a number of tragedies like the loss of one of my closest friend’s brother, emergency hospitalisation scares (not mine) and the end of a relationship I poured my heart into, with a soul mate I was sure I would grow old with.

Rather than lose myself in an urban kitchen (where I have been known to drown my woes), I’m back in the town where I grew up, in the south of Spain, licking my wounds and slowly picking up the pieces. A number of you have been checking in on me, for which I am grateful. I hope you understand and I apologise for replying in blog form rather than personally by email, but I’ve been taking a vacation from my old life, while exploring the deep spirituality I pushed to the side almost the day I became a journalist. It’s hard to express gratitude to or interest in a divine force when you’re drowning in death and the misery of daily bombings.

Thankfully that’s all behind me.

Now in the care of another friend, I’m free to meditate, do yoga and explore the gorgeous tree lined avenues still frequented by señoritas on their way to the feria. Not much has changed since I left here over a decade ago; not much but me.

I’m slowly remembering that life isn’t full of pain, that friends are our greatest support network, the importance of spirituality in life and the joy found in pushing my body to its (admittedly still weak) limits, under the guidance of wonderful trainer who understands my acquired fragility of recent years. (I’ll be sharing more on how I’m re-building my body next week, as well as sharing tips on getting fit with histamine intolerance/mast cell activation disorder exclusively with my mailing list – don’t forget to sign up.)

And so today, rather than slave over a hot stove, I threw a seemingly random assortment of antihistamine and anti-inflammatory foods into a borrowed European version of my Vitamix (it’s called the Thermomix) and realised I’d come up with a super duper high nutrient white gazpacho.

I poured myself a cup and headed out to eat and then meditate in the shade of a pine tree. It’s been a windy day, so I  had to pick out some pine needles from the gazpacho, but really, there’s so much in my life to be thankful for and a little extra garnish never hurt anyone.

I’d really love it if you’d consider spending some time meditating today on what you’re grateful for. I know I’m very privileged to have you all in my life. Without you I don’t know that I’d have had the same burning desire to research and push the limits of diet and exercise on my healing journey.

I am grateful to you all. xo

I’m deeply indebted to PWS & RHS for your words of wisdom, endless patience and for being my family.

Thanks EKA for taking care of me, force feeding me when I’d given up on myself and reminding me that friendship is never ending. And for loaning me your Thermomix of course!

And to BD for inspiring me to reconnect with something (and someone) I thought I’d lost and showing me how much there is in life to be grateful for, each and every day. 

Enough of the fluff, here’s the recipe and nutritional breakdown:

White Gazpacho Antihistamine and anti-inflammatory nutrients

Don’t forget to check out more antihistamine and anti-inflammatory recipes in the anti-cookbook. 

Almonds: highly anti-inflammatory and high in beneficial nutrients like vitamin E and B vitamins like riboflavin [1].

Olive oil: highly anti-inflammatory, helps prevent osteoporosis [2].

Apple: rich in histamine lowering quercetin and inhibit the development of allergies [3].

Cauliflower: anti-inflammatory Vitamin K rich, lowers multiple inflammatory markers significantly [4].

Fennel: anti-inflammatory, antihistamine, analgesic and antioxidant [5].

Apple cider vinegar: is the lowest histamine of all vinegars (according to various histamine food lists on the internet). Made from apples which posses significant antihistamine and mast cell stabilising activity. I use it quite a bit.

Saffron: an H1 receptor antagonist (like claritin for example) [7].

Garlic: anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, now being investigated as IBS treatment. Also has some mast cell stabilising properties [8].

Cucumber: analgesic, antioxidant, prevents prostaglandin (inflammatory molecule) synthesis [9].

Carrot: I try and eat purple ones which possess even greater anti-inflammatory activity than the usual orange coloured [10].

White Gazpacho

Ingredients:

1/2 cup white almonds, soaked overnight
1 cups ice cold water
or
1/4 cup smooth white almond butter
1/2 cup ice cold water
1/2 cup olive oil
1 apple, peeled and chopped
1/4 cup cauliflower, chopped
4 tbsp chopped fennel (optional)
2-4 tbsp apple cider vingegar or lemon juice/tamarind paste
10 threads saffron
2 cloves garlic
handful chives, very finely chopped
white pepper
pinch of himalayan salt
optional
1 cucumber, finely chopped
1 carrot, finely chopped

Directions:

Blend together all the ingredients but the saffron, chives and white pepper.

Pour into individual bowls.

Garinsh with saffron, chives and white pepper, as well as cucumber and carrot if using.

Enjoy!

Don’t forget to sign up to my newsletter to be the first to know when registration opens up for webinars, histamine wellness retreats and workshops in Europe and the United States, to get great freebies like antihistamine and anti-inflammatory recipes and lifestyle tips

The Anti-cookbook, while it doesn’t treat any conditions, due to its high nutrient, antihistamine and anti-inflammatory ingredients, has been instrumental in helping me feed myself on a limited diet. It features a six page list of antihistamine and anti-inflammatory foods. It comes in regular and Paleo. 

The Low Oxalate Cookbook features antihistamine and anti-inflammatory rich recipes. 

Don’t miss the Low Histamine Beauty Survival Guide for non-toxic beauty tips, the skinny on histamine releasing (mast cell degranulating) beauty ingredients, antihistamine and anti-inflammatory beauty alternatives and the top brands natural brands I’ve found.

Take a peek at my other low histamine and antihistamine cookbooks for more high nutrient recipes.

If you’ve found this information useful I’d appreciate your support (at no extra cost to you!) – please check out my online store for your health foods, supplements, kitchen items and beauty product purchases. Affiliate sales through my online store go towards maintaining the website, funding travel to interviews and purchasing all the lovely foods for my free online recipes. You’ll find these items in the “Shop with us” drop down menu on my homepage.  

Please don’t forget antihistamine, pain killing foods can still hurt us, so please always check with your doctor before adding new foods to your diet. 

————– REFERENCES —————

[1-9] The Anti-Cookbook. Yasmina Ykelenstam, 2013.

[10] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18433135

 

Recipes

Antihistamine & anti-inflammatory rich Thai rice salad

No Comments 27 May 2014

IMG_1041

Mmmmmm, two of my favourite hobbies came together in a very pleasing manner recently when I finally managed to get my butt into gear to get to Triyoga, one of Europe’s most highly regarded yoga studios here in London (where I’ve been living).

Ironic that I only managed to do it two weeks before leaving for what’s shaping up to be a very, very long absence from home, but hey, that’s the way the (gluten and dairy free, low histamine, anti-inflammatory) cookie crumbles.

Investing my remaining time in London taking full advantage of their introductory £20/$35 for two weeks of unlimited yoga offer, I spent my days class hopping, from vinyasa flow to yin to scaravelli, to you name it, often all in one day. Having re-discovered my appetite in recent years,  I naturally got hungry between classes. Luckily Triyoga in both Chelsea and Primrose Hill (and soon Soho) have excellent cafes that I’d likely take the trouble to visit even when not attending a class.

The ever changing menu definitely held my interest, and even though I’m no longer a fan of grains, one of my favourites turned out to be their Thai rice salad. So today, while chilling by the pool in the south of Spain (don’t hate me, I was typing away on the sun lounger!), I decided I needed to whip up a super duper pimped out version for myself.

A quick trip to the place where the locals get their veg left me gasping for air as I fought for my share of juicy produce. Priced at least a quarter of the asking price at local supermarkets, it was populated by dozens of hot blooded shouty Andalusian’s unapologetically elbowing their way through the stalls. One woman actually seemed ready to get into a fight with me over beautifully constructed fire engine red pepper I snagged for the photos.

You may have noticed the cheeky serving of raspberries in the photo. Why would I include a food that’s listed as high histamine on most food lists? Have a read of this for an explanation of how I’m healing myself using a histamine-balanced approach rather than starving myself of nutrients and joy. In Lebanon (where my mom is from) we eat a bucket load of fresh fruit after meals – I am aware of the food combining “rules”, but those of you who read this blog regularly will know that I’m a bit of a rebel ;) As for the lime, you can use lemon, or nothing at all. 

Nutritional benefits of this recipe:

Red pepper: anti-inflammatory, high in vitamin E (can be inflammatory to some – is a nightshade) [1]

Green peas: 1 cup provides nearly 100% of your RDA Vitamin C and nearly 50% inflammation fighting and bone building Vitamin K [2]

Onion: is one of the richest sources of histamine lowering quercetin [3]

Basil: as potent an anti-inflammatory as the pharmaceutical Diclofenac. Holy Basil meanwhile is as potent an antihistamine/H2 receptor antagonist as Zantac/ranitidine [4]

As for the rest:

Antihistamine: apple, ginger

Anti-inflammatory: carrot, coriander, chile, olive oil, sesame oil

You’ll find six pages of antihistamine and anti-inflammatory foods in the anti-cookbook…

Antihistamine & anti-inflammatory rich Thai rice salad 

Ingredients

1/2 cup rice (brown if not low oxalate), I used basmati

1/4 cup long grain wild rice (optional)

1 red pepper, finely chopped (optional – it’s a nightshade)

1 cup green peas (optional – appears on some lists as high histamine. You could also use lentils)

1 red onion (use shallots if low oxalate)

2 carrots, shredded

1 cup basil, finely chopped (or to taste)

1/2 cup coriander, finely chopped (or to taste)

1 small chile (optional), finely chopped

4 tbsp grated ginger (or to taste)

olive or sesame oil (or any tolerated), to taste

1/4 cup apple juice or 2-4 tbsp coconut nectar

1 lime, squeezed (optional – on some lists as a histamine liberator) or 2 tbsp apple cider vinegar with mother (the lowest histamine of all vinegars)

Directions

Combine the ginger, apple juice/coconut nectar, sesame oil, lime/vinegar and chile. Allow to sit in the fridge while you Cook the rice according to directions.

Once strained, combine the rice, red pepper (if using), green peas, onion, and dressing in a large bowl.

Garnish with extra lime or basil and serve.

Enjoy!

Don’t forget to sign up to my newsletter to make sure you don’t miss information about upcoming histamine wellness retreats and workshops in Europe and the United States, to get great freebies like antihistamine and anti-inflammatory recipes and lifestyle tips

The Anti-cookbook, while it doesn’t treat any conditions, due to its high nutrient, antihistamine and anti-inflammatory ingredients, has been instrumental in helping me feed myself on a limited diet. It features a six page list of antihistamine and anti-inflammatory foods. It comes in regular and Paleo. 

The Low Oxalate Cookbook features antihistamine and anti-inflammatory rich recipes. 

Don’t miss the Low Histamine Beauty Survival Guide for non-toxic beauty tips, the skinny on histamine releasing (mast cell degranulating) beauty ingredients, antihistamine and anti-inflammatory beauty alternatives and the top brands natural brands I’ve found.

Take a peek at my other low histamine and antihistamine cookbooks for more high nutrient recipes.

If you’ve found this information useful I’d appreciate your support (at no extra cost to you!) – please check out my online store for your health foods, supplements, kitchen items and beauty product purchases. Affiliate sales through my online store go towards maintaining the website, funding travel to interviews and purchasing all the lovely foods for my free online recipes. You’ll find these items in the “Shop with us” drop down menu on my homepage.  

Please don’t forget antihistamine, pain killing foods can still hurt us, so please always check with your doctor before adding new foods to your diet.

————-REFERENCES————–

[1] http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0278691502000376

[2] http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2520/2

[3] http://fnic.nal.usda.gov/404/fnic/foodcomp/Data/Other/AICR03_VegFlav.pdf

[4] http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-1216278/How-eating-fresh-basil-help-banish-arthritic-aches-pains.html

[5] http://thelowhistaminechef.com/holy-basil-the-anti-inflammatory-anti-histamine-superstar/

 

 

 

Recipes

Gluten Free Blackberry Saffron Almond Cake (paleo)

1 Comment 19 April 2014

low histamine dessert

So much yumminess emanates from my friend Alejandra Ramos’ website Always Order Dessert. Once delicious recipe after the next tumbles effortlessly from this Latina bombshell’s lips, only to be Tweeted by the Domestic Goddess herself, Nigella Lawson. Nigella most recently took a fancy to a Blackberry Saffron Almond cake that I can only describe as heaven on a plate.

I couldn’t resist whipping up a low histamine version with antihistamine and anti-inflammatory ingredients, for those of us dealing with allergies,  inflammatory conditions like POTS, fibromyalgia, ME, histamine intolerance, mast cell activation or mastocytosis. Fluffy but dense, moist and welcoming, this cake is exactly the kind of luscious but guilty treat to be shared with the gals over a cup of steaming tea, or with a tall glass of lemonade on grandma’s porch, or even at the first ever histamine/mast cell focused retreat – Wellapalooza.

 IMG_0935

The best news? It was easily customisable and already featured a number of antihistamine and anti-inflammatory foods. All I had to do was substitute a few more to really pack in that healing goodness you’ll find in all my cookbooks.

You can use any fruit you like, I would think chunks of mango, blueberries, or for those (like me) on a histamine-balanced diet rather than an extended elimination based low histamine diet, pineapple would do quite nicely!

Nutritional highlights:

Coconut: exhibits significant painkilling [1], wound healing and histamine induced inflammation-suppressing action [2].

Tapioca/cassava/yucca: anti-inflammatory, but exercise caution if suffering from latex allergy [3].

Sorghum: certain species of sorghum are anti-inflammatory [4}.

Almonds: highly anti-inflammatory and high in beneficial nutrients like vitamin E and B vitamins like riboflavin [5].

Calcium (I use seaweed derived) Lifestream: many of us with histamine/mast cell disorders end up with osteoporosis.

Duck eggs: yolks are larger than those of chicken eggs, which cuts down on potential reactions to uncooked whites, as well as providing 158% of your daily needed vitamin B12. They’re also six times higher in vitamin D than chicken eggs. Many people who don’t tolerate chicken eggs do fine with duck (please always check with your doctor).

Saffron: H1 receptor antagonist and an anti-inflammatory [6].

Blackberries: high in histamine-lowering quercetin and vitamin C, but some may react to the benzoates [7].

Alejandra’s Blackberry Saffron Almond Cake

Ingredients:

1 cup sorghum flour

1/2 cup tapioca flour

1/4 cup almond meal (or same amount of finely ground almonds blitzed in the food processor)

1 1/2 teaspoons calcium carbonate

1 teaspoon kosher salt

3/4 cup (1 1/2 sticks) coconut butter, softened at room temperature

1 cup date or coconut sugar

3 large duck eggs, room temperature

1 teaspoon saffron threads

1/4 cup coconut milk

Grated zest of 1 whole lemon

3 cups blackberries (about 3 cups), rinsed and patted dry (or any tolerated fruit, cut into chunks)

Preparation:

Pre-heat your oven to 350F/180C.

Combine the flour, almond meal, your choice of raising agent (I used seaweed derived calcium) and salt.

Now, I’m not the type who goes in for all the fancy shmancy “beat till fluffy” nonsense that permeates many actual chef blogs, but I thought I’d actually follow directions for once, and it turned out great! So, in a blender, buzz the sugar and butter till fluffy. Turn onto a lower speed and add in the eggs, one by one. I then added the lemon zest.

In a small saucepan, heat the coconut milk. Add in the saffron threads and bring to the boil, before removing from heat and allowing to cool/steep until the milk turns a deep shade of saffron. Once cool, add to the batter in the blender.

I don’t use packaged non-dairy milks. Ever. They’re full of nasty, inflammatory ingredients like carrageenan, maltodextrin and lots more. I generally make my coconut milk fresh from young Thai coconuts. Just crack it open (many youtube tutorials on this), scoop out the flesh, then add as much of the coconut water as needed to blend to your desired consistency.

Switch the blender to the lowest speed, add in the flour mixture and combine well. Pour/spread into your chosen dish – Alejandra used a springform pan, I used a cute decorative, shallow terracotta dish.

Arrange the berries in a pleasing pattern; I kind of just dropped them wherever looked pretty. Don’t worry if you have to layer some on top of each other.

I baked mine for about 40 minutes, you’ll want to check yours with a tester/fork/toothpick, make sure it comes out clean.

Allow to cool. I cut mine into 25 squares, just enough to feed the participants of the first ever histamine wellness retreat.

The Anti-cookbook, while it doesn’t treat any conditions, due to its high nutrient, antihistamine and anti-inflammatory ingredients, has been instrumental in helping me feed myself on a limited diet. It features a six page list of antihistamine and anti-inflammatory foods. It comes in regular and Paleo. 

The Low Oxalate Cookbook features antihistamine and anti-inflammatory rich recipes. 

Take a peek at my low histamine and antihistamine cookbooks for more high nutrient recipes. If you’ve found this information useful I’d appreciate your support (at no extra cost to you!) – please check out my online store for your health foods, supplements, kitchen items and beauty product purchases. Affiliate sales through my online store go towards maintaining the website, funding travel to interviews and purchasing all the lovely foods for my free online recipes.

You’ll find these items in the “Shop with us” drop down menu on my homepage.  

Please don’t forget antihistamine, pain killing foods can still hurt us, so please always check with your doctor before adding new foods to your diet. 

————-REFERENCES———–

[1] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19429325

[2] http://scialert.net/abstract/?doi=jpt.2006.516.526

[3] http://www.sciencepub.net/nature/0708/12_0996_TRIHERBAL_ns0708.pdf

[4] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20673059

[5] http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jsfa.2659/abstract

[6] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20432629

[7] http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jf00070a001

Recipes

Sunflower seed butter cookies (gluten and dairy free)

No Comments 21 March 2014

 gluten free high nutrient cookies

The great thing about staying in a house with kids is that they give you an excuse to go nutty with the cookie batter. The bad news is that, well, you get nutty with the cookie batter!

Luckily, my gluten/dairy/nut/white sugar free, medium oxalate cookies are just as high nutrient as the rest of my diet, so I really didn’t feel too bad scarfing down a bunch; those that I managed to wrestle away from my friend’s daughter anyway. She declared them “delicious!” – this from a kid who, though a healthy eater, hasn’t been too interested in my date sweetened concoctions in the past (not sweet enough).

So this time I went with coconut sugar. While it’s still sugar, and not in it’s whole form as I normally prefer (dates, banana etc as sweeteners), being lower GI and less processed (so they say) than other commercially available sugars, I can live with it, especially when cooking for others as well as myself.

These cookies are a lot sweeter than I usually make them, but given that I haven’t had any real sugar, store bought treats or anything else nasty for quite some time, I decided to throw the calories to the wind and just go for it.

Rather than use a ton of oil/butter (coconut of course!), I decided to use sunflower seed butter. It definitely imparts a pleasant nutty type of flavour, as well as being rich in Vitamin E, B1, copper and good source of magnesium. While sunflower seeds are anti-inflammatory, particularly exhibiting activity against a number of mast cell mediators (the stuff that leaks out of mast cells, histamine being one of them) [1] and also in alleviating asthma symptoms in mice [2] I’ve found a study showing that they can cause severe anaphylactic shock in some (what can’t?), so please always proceed with caution if trying something for the first time. You can substitute it with almond butter, apple sauce, banana, anything really that’s a little sweet or nutty, or buttery texture. You could also use more coconut oil, vegan coconut yoghurt, or yoghurt instead.

The picture of the cookies above is what they looked like with one cup of sugar (I know sounds like a lot, but I made three trays of cookies!). They were totally sweet enough for me, maybe because I added organic coconut sugar chocolate chips to the batter, but everyone else preferred another half a cup of sugar. Sadly, because coconut sugar doesn’t behave in the same way as regular stuff, it gets very liquid and that batch turned out every flat and large (as in the photo below!). I didn’t realise that was the case (as I had the cookie dough in the fridge) and didn’t adjust the cooking time accordingly, so they came out a little too dark, prompting the littlest one to dub them “kaka coloured”.

Should’t have that problem if snagged at the right time!

gluten sugar free cookies

This recipe makes a whole bunch of cookies, as I said, at least two trays, maybe more, depending on how big you make them. But I had a lot of fun making different batches to match everyone’s expectations. I used chocolate chips, which though organic and white sugar free, may bother come on a low histamine elimination diet (check out why I don’t believe low histamine elimination diets heal – and how I fixed myself without using one)Feel free to use carob chips, no chips (add a little more sugar in that case), or cacao nibs (what I used for my cookies). 

Sunflower Seed Butter Cookies (gluten/dairy free/medium oxalate)

Prep Time:  10| Cook Time: 20-30 | Servings: many!

Ingredients:

1/2 cup sorghum flour

1/2 cup rice flour (or half rice and half tapioca for lower oxalate)

1 cup oats

1/2 cup sunflower seed butter

2 eggs (or 1 duck egg)

1/4 cup coconut oil

1 tsp scraped vanilla from a pod

1 cup coconut sugar (add 1.25 cups if not using chips, and 1.5 if you’re really into your sugar – I used 1.25 cups for the ones I ended up eating)

pinch sea salt

Optional

1/2 cup vegan chocolate/carob chips, or cacao nibs (use less sugar if using)

Directions:

Pre-heat oven to 180C/350F.

Mix dry ingredients in a large bowl.

Combine the wet ingredients in another, mix thoroughly and then combine with the flours. Place in the fridge for a few minutes to firm up.

Spoon bits of dough onto a non-stick baking tray and bake for 20-30 mins, depending on sugar used and oven type.

Once cooked through, allow to cool on a rack for at least 10-20 mins.

Enjoy!

Join my mailing list for more recipes and to be the first to know when registration for my low histamine webinar opens!

The Anti-cookbook, while it doesn’t treat any conditions, due to its high nutrient, antihistamine and anti-inflammatory ingredients, has been instrumental in helping me feed myself on a limited diet. It features a six page list of antihistamine and anti-inflammatory foods. It comes in regular and Paleo. 

The Low Oxalate Cookbook features antihistamine and anti-inflammatory rich recipes. 

Take a peek at my low histamine and antihistamine cookbooks for more high nutrient recipes. If you’ve found this information useful I’d appreciate your support (at no extra cost to you!) – please check out my online store for your health foods, supplements, kitchen items and beauty product purchases. Affiliate sales through my online store go towards maintaining the website, funding travel to interviews and purchasing all the lovely foods for my free online recipes.

You’ll find these items in the “Shop with us” drop down menu on my homepage.  

Please don’t forget antihistamine, pain killing foods can still hurt us, so please always check with your doctor before adding new foods to your diet. 

———–REFERENCES————-

[1] http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006291X08003707

[2] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18097616

Recipes

The Low Oxalate (low histamine) Cookbook

No Comments 04 March 2014

lowoxalatecookbook

The low oxalate cookbook isn’t just for those on a low oxalate diet…there’s plenty of tasty, high nutrient, low histamine recipes for all!

Wondering how on earth to go low oxalate and low histamine at the same time?

The low oxalate cookbook serves up the high nutrient antihistamine and anti-inflammatory recipes I created to fuel my body while healing. You’ll find healthy green juices and smoothies, pancakes, waffles, tarts, tacos and more, many of which feature simple adaptations the entire family will enjoy.

low oxalate low histamine pancakes

In keeping with my dietary philosophy, this book doesn’t embrace the pursuit of the elimination of symptoms through restriction, but rather adding as much nutrition to the body as possible, to give it a fighting chance of healing overall. Recipes do not contain: refined sugars, soy, corn, dairy, nuts or gluten.

low oxalate low histamine butternut squash noodles

Purchase the low oxalate cookbook here. 

This book is not vegan. Please note that as with histamine lists, oxalate lists vary in content, so I have chosen not to include any particular list of low oxalate foods in this book. The recipes were created using Susan Owen’s oxalate food list. I highly recommend joining her ‘trying low oxalates yahoo group’ for a comprehensive list. 

low oxalate muffins

Join my mailing list for more recipes and to be the first to know when registration for my low histamine webinar opens!

Take a peek at my low histamine and antihistamine cookbooks for more high nutrient recipes.

If you’ve found this information useful I’d appreciate your support (at no extra cost to you!) – please check out my online store for your health foods, supplements, kitchen items and beauty product purchases. Affiliate sales through my online store go towards maintaining the website, funding travel to interviews and purchasing all the lovely foods for my free online recipes. You’ll find these items in the “Shop with us” drop down menu on my homepage.

 Please don’t forget antihistamine, pain killing foods can still hurt us, so please always check with your doctor before adding new foods to your diet. 

Recipes

Anti-inflammatory Fruit Bread (gluten free)

No Comments 27 February 2014

IMG_0708

Breakfast, we’re told, is the most important meal of the day. Which is why a quart/litre of green juice/smoothie is my absolute favourite. Sometimes though I’m feeling a bit more decadent, or want something to snack on later in the day, or even for dessert. And that’s how this antihistamine and anti-inflammatory breakfast fruit loaf was born.

Because I’m no longer limiting my histamine intake, I served mine up with delicious home made raspberry jam (1 cup raspberries, 1/2 cup apple juice, 1 tsbp coconut sugar, 10 grapes, pinch of salt and a little lemon juice). Raspberry isn’t considered low histamine on most food lists, so you might want to try high quercetin blueberries, apples, pears or quince for your jam instead.

I used a generous helping of my apple and carrot juicing leftovers, but you can just go ahead and use grated apple and carrot instead. I’ve made this with both coconut and date sugar – lovely either way, but you could also just use dates, or home made applesauce.

You can use baking powder/soda if you’re ok with it – I usually leave it out.

I chopped up the loaf and froze it, then popped the slices into the toaster as needed and served with a generous smear of jam.

Nutrient breakdown: 

Some varieties of sorghum flour possess anti-inflammatory properties [1].

Apples are high in histamine lowering, mast cell degranulation preventing quercetin [2].

Carrots are anti-inflammatory [3].

Coconuts possess anti-inflammatory and pain killing properties [4].

Ginger is an antihistamine (H1 and H2 receptor antagonist) and anti-inflammatory [5].

Duck eggs are very high in Vitamin B12 [6].

Vanilla is an anti-inflammatory [7].

Fruit loaf

Prep Time: 5-10mins | Cook Time: 30-40 | Servings:  8-12| Difficulty: Easy

Ingredients:

1 cup sorghum flour

1/2 cup apple juicing remains

1/2 cup carrot juicing remains

2 tbsp ginger juicing remains

1/2 cup coconut/date sugar

1/4 cup coconut butter

2 eggs (or 1/2 cup vegan coconut yoghurt) I use 1 large duck which provides 70% RDA Vitamin B12

1 tsp vanilla (if tolerated)

pinch salt

Directions:

Pre-heat your oven to 200C/350F.

Combine the flour, apple, carrot, ginger, vanilla and pinch of sea salt in a bowl. In a blender, or in a small bowl, whisk together the sugar, eggs and coconut butter till fluffy. Make a well in the flour and spoon in the egg mix.

Combine, pour into a small to medium baking tin and bake for 30-40 minutes.

Remove from the oven, tip out onto cooling rack.

Slice and freeze.

Join my mailing list for more recipes and to be the first to know when registration for my low histamine webinar opens!

Take a peek at my low histamine and antihistamine cookbooks for more high nutrient recipes.

If you’ve found this information useful I’d appreciate your support (at no extra cost to you!) – please check out my online store for your health foods, supplements, kitchen items and beauty product purchases. Affiliate sales through my online store go towards maintaining the website, funding travel to interviews and purchasing all the lovely foods for my free online recipes. You’ll find these items in the “Shop with us” drop down menu on my homepage.

 Please don’t forget antihistamine, pain killing foods can still hurt us, so please always check with your doctor before adding new foods to your diet. 

———-REFERENCES———–

[1] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20673059

[2] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16081068

[3] http://www.everydayhealth.com/rheumatoid-arthritis-pictures/foods-that-fight-inflammation.aspx

[4] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19429325

[5] http://journals.tums.ac.ir/upload_files/pdf/_/2382.pdf

[6] http://www.fitday.com/fitness-articles/nutrition/vitamins-minerals/the-8-best-foods-for-vitamin-b12.html

[7] http://www.rethinkingcancer.org/blog/spice-of-the-month-vanilla/

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This book (Low Histamine On the Go) showed me I can stick to my dietary limitations while still experimenting and adding flavors in ways I wasn’t used to.Seashore.

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