Recipes

Sunflower seed butter cookies (gluten and dairy free)

No Comments 21 March 2014

 gluten free high nutrient cookies

The great thing about staying in a house with kids is that they give you an excuse to go nutty with the cookie batter. The bad news is that, well, you get nutty with the cookie batter!

Luckily, my gluten/dairy/nut/white sugar free, medium oxalate cookies are just as high nutrient as the rest of my diet, so I really didn’t feel too bad scarfing down a bunch; those that I managed to wrestle away from my friend’s daughter anyway. She declared them “delicious!” – this from a kid who, though a healthy eater, hasn’t been too interested in my date sweetened concoctions in the past (not sweet enough).

So this time I went with coconut sugar. While it’s still sugar, and not in it’s whole form as I normally prefer (dates, banana etc as sweeteners), being lower GI and less processed (so they say) than other commercially available sugars, I can live with it, especially when cooking for others as well as myself.

These cookies are a lot sweeter than I usually make them, but given that I haven’t had any real sugar, store bought treats or anything else nasty for quite some time, I decided to throw the calories to the wind and just go for it.

Rather than use a ton of oil/butter (coconut of course!), I decided to use sunflower seed butter. It definitely imparts a pleasant nutty type of flavour, as well as being rich in Vitamin E, B1, copper and good source of magnesium. While sunflower seeds are anti-inflammatory, particularly exhibiting activity against a number of mast cell mediators (the stuff that leaks out of mast cells, histamine being one of them) [1] and also in alleviating asthma symptoms in mice [2] I’ve found a study showing that they can cause severe anaphylactic shock in some (what can’t?), so please always proceed with caution if trying something for the first time. You can substitute it with almond butter, apple sauce, banana, anything really that’s a little sweet or nutty, or buttery texture. You could also use more coconut oil, vegan coconut yoghurt, or yoghurt instead.

The picture of the cookies above is what they looked like with one cup of sugar (I know sounds like a lot, but I made three trays of cookies!). They were totally sweet enough for me, maybe because I added organic coconut sugar chocolate chips to the batter, but everyone else preferred another half a cup of sugar. Sadly, because coconut sugar doesn’t behave in the same way as regular stuff, it gets very liquid and that batch turned out every flat and large (as in the photo below!). I didn’t realise that was the case (as I had the cookie dough in the fridge) and didn’t adjust the cooking time accordingly, so they came out a little too dark, prompting the littlest one to dub them “kaka coloured”.

Should’t have that problem if snagged at the right time!

gluten sugar free cookies

This recipe makes a whole bunch of cookies, as I said, at least two trays, maybe more, depending on how big you make them. But I had a lot of fun making different batches to match everyone’s expectations. I used chocolate chips, which though organic and white sugar free, may bother come on a low histamine elimination diet (check out why I don’t believe low histamine elimination diets heal – and how I fixed myself without using one)Feel free to use carob chips, no chips (add a little more sugar in that case), or cacao nibs (what I used for my cookies). 

Sunflower Seed Butter Cookies (gluten/dairy free/medium oxalate)

Prep Time:  10| Cook Time: 20-30 | Servings: many!

Ingredients:

1/2 cup sorghum flour

1/2 cup rice flour (or half rice and half tapioca for lower oxalate)

1 cup oats

1/2 cup sunflower seed butter

2 eggs (or 1 duck egg)

1/4 cup coconut oil

1 tsp scraped vanilla from a pod

1 cup coconut sugar (add 1.25 cups if not using chips, and 1.5 if you’re really into your sugar – I used 1.25 cups for the ones I ended up eating)

pinch sea salt

Optional

1/2 cup vegan chocolate/carob chips, or cacao nibs (use less sugar if using)

Directions:

Pre-heat oven to 180C/350F.

Mix dry ingredients in a large bowl.

Combine the wet ingredients in another, mix thoroughly and then combine with the flours. Place in the fridge for a few minutes to firm up.

Spoon bits of dough onto a non-stick baking tray and bake for 20-30 mins, depending on sugar used and oven type.

Once cooked through, allow to cool on a rack for at least 10-20 mins.

Enjoy!

Join my mailing list for more recipes and to be the first to know when registration for my low histamine webinar opens!

The Anti-cookbook, while it doesn’t treat any conditions, due to its high nutrient, antihistamine and anti-inflammatory ingredients, has been instrumental in helping me feed myself on a limited diet. It features a six page list of antihistamine and anti-inflammatory foods. It comes in regular and Paleo. 

The Low Oxalate Cookbook features antihistamine and anti-inflammatory rich recipes. 

Take a peek at my low histamine and antihistamine cookbooks for more high nutrient recipes. If you’ve found this information useful I’d appreciate your support (at no extra cost to you!) – please check out my online store for your health foods, supplements, kitchen items and beauty product purchases. Affiliate sales through my online store go towards maintaining the website, funding travel to interviews and purchasing all the lovely foods for my free online recipes.

You’ll find these items in the “Shop with us” drop down menu on my homepage.  

Please don’t forget antihistamine, pain killing foods can still hurt us, so please always check with your doctor before adding new foods to your diet. 

———–REFERENCES————-

[1] http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006291X08003707

[2] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18097616

Recipes

The Low Oxalate (low histamine) Cookbook

No Comments 04 March 2014

lowoxalatecookbook

The low oxalate cookbook isn’t just for those on a low oxalate diet…there’s plenty of tasty, high nutrient, low histamine recipes for all!

Wondering how on earth to go low oxalate and low histamine at the same time?

The low oxalate cookbook serves up the high nutrient antihistamine and anti-inflammatory recipes I created to fuel my body while healing. You’ll find healthy green juices and smoothies, pancakes, waffles, tarts, tacos and more, many of which feature simple adaptations the entire family will enjoy.

low oxalate low histamine pancakes

In keeping with my dietary philosophy, this book doesn’t embrace the pursuit of the elimination of symptoms through restriction, but rather adding as much nutrition to the body as possible, to give it a fighting chance of healing overall. Recipes do not contain: refined sugars, soy, corn, dairy, nuts or gluten.

low oxalate low histamine butternut squash noodles

Purchase the low oxalate cookbook here. 

This book is not vegan. Please note that as with histamine lists, oxalate lists vary in content, so I have chosen not to include any particular list of low oxalate foods in this book. The recipes were created using Susan Owen’s oxalate food list. I highly recommend joining her ‘trying low oxalates yahoo group’ for a comprehensive list. 

low oxalate muffins

Join my mailing list for more recipes and to be the first to know when registration for my low histamine webinar opens!

Take a peek at my low histamine and antihistamine cookbooks for more high nutrient recipes.

If you’ve found this information useful I’d appreciate your support (at no extra cost to you!) – please check out my online store for your health foods, supplements, kitchen items and beauty product purchases. Affiliate sales through my online store go towards maintaining the website, funding travel to interviews and purchasing all the lovely foods for my free online recipes. You’ll find these items in the “Shop with us” drop down menu on my homepage.

 Please don’t forget antihistamine, pain killing foods can still hurt us, so please always check with your doctor before adding new foods to your diet. 

Recipes

Anti-inflammatory Fruit Bread (gluten free)

No Comments 27 February 2014

IMG_0708

Breakfast, we’re told, is the most important meal of the day. Which is why a quart/litre of green juice/smoothie is my absolute favourite. Sometimes though I’m feeling a bit more decadent, or want something to snack on later in the day, or even for dessert. And that’s how this antihistamine and anti-inflammatory breakfast fruit loaf was born.

Because I’m no longer limiting my histamine intake, I served mine up with delicious home made raspberry jam (1 cup raspberries, 1/2 cup apple juice, 1 tsbp coconut sugar, 10 grapes, pinch of salt and a little lemon juice). Raspberry isn’t considered low histamine on most food lists, so you might want to try high quercetin blueberries, apples, pears or quince for your jam instead.

I used a generous helping of my apple and carrot juicing leftovers, but you can just go ahead and use grated apple and carrot instead. I’ve made this with both coconut and date sugar – lovely either way, but you could also just use dates, or home made applesauce.

You can use baking powder/soda if you’re ok with it – I usually leave it out.

I chopped up the loaf and froze it, then popped the slices into the toaster as needed and served with a generous smear of jam.

Nutrient breakdown: 

Some varieties of sorghum flour possess anti-inflammatory properties [1].

Apples are high in histamine lowering, mast cell degranulation preventing quercetin [2].

Carrots are anti-inflammatory [3].

Coconuts possess anti-inflammatory and pain killing properties [4].

Ginger is an antihistamine (H1 and H2 receptor antagonist) and anti-inflammatory [5].

Duck eggs are very high in Vitamin B12 [6].

Vanilla is an anti-inflammatory [7].

Fruit loaf

Prep Time: 5-10mins | Cook Time: 30-40 | Servings:  8-12| Difficulty: Easy

Ingredients:

1 cup sorghum flour

1/2 cup apple juicing remains

1/2 cup carrot juicing remains

2 tbsp ginger juicing remains

1/2 cup coconut/date sugar

1/4 cup coconut butter

2 eggs (or 1/2 cup vegan coconut yoghurt) I use 1 large duck which provides 70% RDA Vitamin B12

1 tsp vanilla (if tolerated)

pinch salt

Directions:

Pre-heat your oven to 200C/350F.

Combine the flour, apple, carrot, ginger, vanilla and pinch of sea salt in a bowl. In a blender, or in a small bowl, whisk together the sugar, eggs and coconut butter till fluffy. Make a well in the flour and spoon in the egg mix.

Combine, pour into a small to medium baking tin and bake for 30-40 minutes.

Remove from the oven, tip out onto cooling rack.

Slice and freeze.

Join my mailing list for more recipes and to be the first to know when registration for my low histamine webinar opens!

Take a peek at my low histamine and antihistamine cookbooks for more high nutrient recipes.

If you’ve found this information useful I’d appreciate your support (at no extra cost to you!) – please check out my online store for your health foods, supplements, kitchen items and beauty product purchases. Affiliate sales through my online store go towards maintaining the website, funding travel to interviews and purchasing all the lovely foods for my free online recipes. You’ll find these items in the “Shop with us” drop down menu on my homepage.

 Please don’t forget antihistamine, pain killing foods can still hurt us, so please always check with your doctor before adding new foods to your diet. 

———-REFERENCES———–

[1] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20673059

[2] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16081068

[3] http://www.everydayhealth.com/rheumatoid-arthritis-pictures/foods-that-fight-inflammation.aspx

[4] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19429325

[5] http://journals.tums.ac.ir/upload_files/pdf/_/2382.pdf

[6] http://www.fitday.com/fitness-articles/nutrition/vitamins-minerals/the-8-best-foods-for-vitamin-b12.html

[7] http://www.rethinkingcancer.org/blog/spice-of-the-month-vanilla/

Recipes

Anti-inflammatory Mushroom Summer Rolls

No Comments 09 February 2014

IMG_0653

Here’s an explanation of why I include higher histamine food in my personal diet (but not yet in my cookbooks!).

Four years had passed since a mushroom graced my palate, when, on a whim, I bravely ordered up “Field Mushrooms with Parmesan and Arugula, in a Butter Garlic Sauce” in a small country pub in the unashamedly hippie English town of Hebden Bridge.

My man feigned indifference at my order, but I imagined he was secretly excited.

Maybe I was projecting, but I’m quite sure he had only half believed my declaration of a few months ago: “I’m going to eat whatever I want, no matter what *loody list it’s on, because I’m CONVINCED I’ve healed.”

I then enlisted his help to make sure I didn’t slip into old patterns, by attributing any symptoms to food or beauty products. Easier said than done. Till I hit upon a little technique combining meditation, quietening what I believed to be an overactive amygdala, with just a pinch of neuro-linguistic programming. I’m still working on it, but will be sure to share when I can figure out how to, without anyone getting hurt. I’m actually hoping to interest a doctor in it so that it can safely be trialled.

Why did I believe this would work? This year I came across some studies on pavlovian conditioning in allergic reactions. For those unfamiliar with the original experiments, dogs were given food every time a bell rang. Eventually they began to associate the bell with food, and so began salivating, even when no food was forthcoming. The studies I found showed a similar result in allergy patients who exhibited an elevation in tryptase (one of the markers of allergic reactions and mast cell disorders) and others, even though they weren’t actually exposed to the allergen they believed they were.

To be honest though, I also knew that Dr Fuhrman believes people with histamine intolerance should still eat mushrooms, but also a whole host of other foods rich in phytonutrients, in order to heal. Though I’ve always thought the man walked on water, and I believed whole heartedly in his dietary approach, I allowed my previous experiences with inflammatory foods when my body was in complete disrepair, which just so happened to also be high histamine, to taint my present relationship with food (for more on Dr Fuhrman’s thoughts on needing to eat more foods in order to heal histamine and salicylate intolerance as well as mast cell disorders, please read this).

Anti-inflammatory mushroom summer rolls

So, where does that leave Yasmina, about to indulge in some yeasty funghi, smothered in parmesan and butter? Well it left me hungry while they removed the buttery, cheesy mushies they placed in front of me, by mistake, as I had ordered them dairy free – I mean come on, I may be eating what I want, but what I want is still high nutrient and anti-inflammatory.

It would have been weird to try and use my re-introduction technique right there at the table. More boring than weird really, as this lunch took place in what seemed like nothing more than a stolen moment in between five hours of hard core meditation on my mindfulness meditation teacher’s course. So rather than go into a meditative state for the 20th time that day, I simply focused on the conversation, the roaring fireplace warming my stone floor cooled bottom, and dove into my gloriously garlicky, parmesan and butter free portabella mushrooms.

I may have even, after shunning the lovely crusty white loaf in the direction of the waitress, had a split second change of heart and lunged for it after all, deftly nipped the very crustiest bit, before expertly mopping up the saucy dregs from my plate. It was the perfect heart warming, soul affirming experience, more than enough to buoy my spirits for the coming two hour meditation session, after my 5:45am wake up call.

So, back to the present day.

Thanks to my initial plunge into the fun-ghi pool in Hebden Bridge, I was pretty much over my fear of them. I had even higher expectations for my own creation – seeing as I planned to incorporate the usual high nutrient, antihistamine and anti-inflammatory bevy of ingredients to balance out the use of higher histamine ones.

Nutritional breakdown

Mushrooms: inhibit tumour growth (in animal studies) [1], beneficial to the liver [2], potentially prevent breast cancer [3], kill pain and are anti-inflammatory, particularly inhibiting prostaglandins (the stuff that causes brain fog!) [4]. Though they’re ok to eat on Dr Fuhrman’s list (cooked, not raw) and those of others, they do however appear on high histamine lists (though I have yet to understand the testing methodology), so please be aware that despite these benefits, they will be harmful to some. 

Antihistaminic: turmeric, arugula, spring onions, chives, coriander, garlic [5].

Anti-inflammatory: carrots, spring onions, olive oil, chives, arugula, turmeric, coriander, garlic, white pepper [6].

See the anti-cookbook for a six page list of antihistamine and anti-inflammatory foods. 

Anti-inflammatory Mushroom Summer Rolls

Prep Time: 20-30 | Cook Time: 0 | Servings: about 10 rolls | Difficulty: Medium

Ingredients:

4 cups chopped mushrooms

1 bag arugula

2 carrots, shaved

4 spring onions, chopped

chives for garnish

turmeric (I used two pieces about the size of my pinky. I love the stuff but this might be too much for you)

garlic (I used 2 cloves)

salt

white pepper (lower oxalate than black)

olive oil

coriander

1 pack rice paper rolls

1 cup boiled vermicelli or other thin white rice noodles (white because it’s lower oxalate)

Optional

Japanese Mirin rice wine for cooking (like for your partner or if you’re beyond the elimination phase)

1 large fillet of salmon (I used one)

Directions:

In a large pan saute the garlic, spring onions and turmeric in a little olive oil, till fragrant. Add in the mushrooms, carrots and the salmon if using, seasoned with a little salt and white pepper, if you wish.

If using mirin, drizzle it on.

Toss in the cooked rice noodles and arugula and season again.

In a kettle heat up some water till almost boiled. Pour into a shallow plate and then once cool enough (but not cold!) place a rice paper in it till soaked through but not mushy. Carefully withdraw from the water and flip over. This might take a little practice…

Remove and place on a dry surface. In the middle of the roll lay down a couple of pieces of coriander and some of your noodled veggies.

Fold the upper and lower parts of the roll over, then roll horizontally to seal up.

Use two long pieces of chives to nicely tie up the rolls as in the picture.

Join my mailing list for more recipes and to be the first to know when registration for my low histamine webinar opens!

Take a peek at my low histamine and antihistamine cookbooks for more high nutrient recipes.

If you’ve found this information useful I’d appreciate your support (at no extra cost to you!) – please check out my online store for your health foods, supplements, kitchen items and beauty product purchases. Affiliate sales through my online store go towards maintaining the website, funding travel to interviews and purchasing all the lovely foods for my free online recipes. You’ll find these items in the “Shop with us” drop down menu on my homepage.

 Please don’t forget antihistamine, pain killing foods can still hurt us, so please always check with your doctor before adding new foods to your diet. 

REFERENCES….

[1] http://www.mushroomsandhealth.com/files/Files/Mushroom%20Varieties.pdf

[2] http://www.mushroomsandhealth.com/files/Files/Mushroom%20Varieties.pdf

[3] http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2172/10/12/

[4] http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/66/24/12026.short

[5] The Anti-Cookbook, Yasmina Ykelenstam

[6] The Anti-Cookbook, Yasmina Ykelenstam

Recipes

Chickpea Blondies (gluten free, vegan)

No Comments 05 February 2014

Chickpea blondiesI’ve waited FAR too long to post this recipe – why? Because there’s an outcry every time I use an ingredient that some lists consider to be high histamine. Here’s the (high nutrient) scoop – if you’re past the elimination phase of four – six weeks, your palette is yours. I believe it’s up to you to determine which foods help or hurt, but to be honest, in my experience (and that of a growing number of people who write to me and those who book consults with me), once the initial crisis has passed and we’ve calmed our body down through first eliminating everything that bothers us, then supporting the body with proper nutrition (more on how I did it here), eventually we need to deal with our brain being stuck in a place of fear.

Now I’m not saying those who experience anaphylaxis should run out and eat foods they think make them react, but rather that I believe focusing on the negative side of the food experience, ie approaching the table and kitchen with fear and dread, always looking out for the possibility of a reaction, can leave the brain stuck in a PTSD-like state, where the belief that food or an action will cause pain, becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy. Yes, we still have mast cell disorders and histamine intolerance or allergies, but hopefully the work we have done means our body has healed to a certain degree, or has moved on from the original crisis.

Once my inflammation was under control I needed to understand that these things couldn’t hurt me in the same way as before, and so I worked on my beliefs and approach to life. More on how I use my brain to control the histamine itch here and how I use meditation to control my stress response (stress causes mast cell degranulation/histamine release) here.

You’ll also find more on why I use higher histamine (high nutrient) foods here. My books, till now, feature traditionally low histamine foods. But – I’m happy to report that I’m on my way to Spain in a few days, where I’ll be collaborating on an exciting new project with my super talented cousin Omaya (check out her website here). It’ll be in the works for a few months – but to quote my London friends, it’s going to be AMAZEBALLS.

Ok, so down to business!

Chickpea blondies

I recently had fun lightly adapting the recipes of two more talented ladies, Monique at the Ambitious Kitchen and Katie over at Chocolate Covered Katie.

The result – high nutrient chickpea blondies that can easily be adapted once more to your tolerance. I used store bought Steenbergs chocolate chips (I know, gasp! I used something store bought!) that are made of cacao, sugar and nothing else. You can go ahead and use carob chips, dried fruit (I think chopped dates or blueberries will be great), home made cacao chips (I preferred the store bought results), some nuts, or anything you like. Should you not use something that’s sweet, I’d add a little more sweetener to the mix.

Yes, I ate two of these. No, I don’t plan on making a habit of it. Yes, I was totally fine after. No, I’m not saying these are low histamine, but rather that cacao has health benefits I use to help me heal. You can make yours very low histamine by using carob chips or dried fruit. Yes, I realise sugar of all kinds is inflammatory. Why did I make these? Because I wanted a high nutrient treat to share with friends and their kids. Lol, ok, I think I covered all the bases here :)

IMG_8647 2

Chickpea Blondies  

Prep Time: 5 | Cook Time: 25 | Servings: | Difficulty: Easy

Ingredients:

1 bottle chickpeas or 1.5 cups soaked overnight and pressure cooked chickpeas, well rinsed

1/2 cup almond butter (or sunflower for lower oxalate, or 1/2 cup banana)

1/4 cup coconut nectar (or your choice of liquid sweetener)

1/4 cup coconut sugar

1 scraped vanilla pod or 1/2+ tsp vanilla powdered

pinch of salt

1 capsule Twinlab (or other non-ascorbic acid vitamin C)

as many chocolate/carob chips, chopped dates or dried fruit as you like

 Directions:

I used bottled chickpeas for this recipe because you really need to make sure you work with super soft chickpeas. It’s possible to get them that texture at home if using a pressure cooker, but I’ve never managed to do it just by boiling. If using store bought, make sure to sample first. You want them to melt in your mouth.

This recipe was tested with both sunflower seed and almond butter. I preferred the latter, but the former was also really tasty!

The original recipes call for more liquid sweetener – I found this made the blondies too mushy, so I cut it back some and added a little granulated coconut sugar instead.

When I say powdered vanilla, I mean organic, raw, all natural vanilla with nothing else in it.

The vitamin c is in place of bicarb of soda and baking powder. You can use them instead if you prefer. I’m just trying to cram as much goodness into food as possible, in order to balance the histamine. 1000mg of vitamin c usually does the trick!

 Ok, here we go!

Pre-heat your oven to 350F/180C.

In a blender combine the chickpeas, almond butter, coconut nectar, sugar, vanilla, pinch of salt and vitamin c, if using. Process till smooth.

Mix in the chocolate chips and then pour into a baking tray. I made mine about 1.5 inches thick.

Bake for about 20 mins, till cooked through but not dry.

Enjoy!

Join my mailing list for more recipes and to be the first to know when registration for my low histamine webinar opens!

Take a peek at my low histamine and antihistamine cookbooks for more high nutrient recipes.

If you’ve found this information useful I’d appreciate your support (at no extra cost to you!) – please check out my online store for your health foods, supplements, kitchen items and beauty product purchases. Affiliate sales through my online store go towards maintaining the website, funding travel to interviews and purchasing all the lovely foods for my free online recipes. You’ll find these items in the “Shop with us” drop down menu on my homepage.

 Please don’t forget antihistamine, pain killing foods can still hurt us, so please always check with your doctor before adding new foods to your diet. 

Recipes

Creamy Vegan Dulce de Leche Ice Cream (antihistamine & anti-inflammatory)

1 Comment 21 January 2014

dulcedelecheantihistamineicecream

Drool alert!

It’s the antihistamine and anti-inflammatory ice cream I’ve been promising…you don’t actually need an ice cream maker, but it sure makes it easier! I include instructions for with and without.

Dulce de Leche is one of my all time favourite ice cream flavours – a kind of toffee/caramel taste. The literal translation from the Spanish is: “milk  sweet” or “sweet of milk”. It’s traditionally made from condensed milk, but thanks to the creamy butternut texture and the caramel flavour of the coconut sugar, we’re all set. You can however heat up the mixture to condense it before freezing. Adding a couple of eggs will also make it creamier, but I prefer vegan ice cream (I know, I’m an odd duck!).

I used coconut sugar, but you can use dates for a more chewy/caramel texture. You could also swirl in a date/almond milk caramel.

Why this is a health food:

Butternut squash is an antihistamine and anti-inflammatory food.

Coconut possesses anti-inflammatory and analgesic (pain killing) properties.

Ginger and turmeric are both antihistamine and anti-inflammatory foods.

Vanilla is anti-inflammatory.

(6 pages of antihistamine and anti-inflammatory foods and a ton of recipes in the Anti-cookbooks)

If you’re not into any kind of sugar, add dates, apple puree, or anything you like to sweeten it up. I found 3/4 of a cup of coconut sugar excessive, but friends loved it.

Desserts like this are why I scoff at people who say my diet is boring.

It’s only as boring as the limits of your imagination!

Enjoy :)

Creamy Vegan Dulce de Leche Ice Cream (antihistamine and anti-inflammatory)

Prep Time: 10 | Cook Time: 20 | Freeze time: 1-3 hours  | Serves: 2-4

Ingredients:

1 medium butternut squash
1 cup thick coconut cream
3/4 cup coconut sugar
1/2 tsp – 1tbsp pure vanilla (as tolerated, optional, to taste)
1/2 tsp – 1tbsp grated ginger, optional, to taste
1/2 tsp – 1tbsp grated turmeric, optional, to taste
pinch of salt

Directions:

Pre-heat your oven to 200C/390F.

Slice your butternut squash in half and place in the oven. Bake for about 20 minutes till soft (use a fork to test), scoop out the seeds, discard. Then scoop out the flesh.

Place in a blender to puree.

In a powerful blender combine the butternut, coconut cream, coconut sugar or dates, vanilla, salt, ginger and turmeric, if using.

Ice cream maker

Pour very very slowly into your pre-frozen ice cream machine. Churn for about 20-30 minutes, according to your machine’s directions.

Place in the freezer for another 30 minutes+.

By hand

Pour into a container and freeze. Every 30 minutes break up the ice crystals, until the ice cream is frozen.

With a geared juicer (ie Samson/Oscar) or Vitamix

Freeze your ice cream mix till hard. Cut into chunks and lightly process in blender or juicer.

Enjoy!

Join my mailing list for more recipes and to be the first to know when registration for my low histamine webinar opens!

Take a peek at my low histamine and antihistamine cookbooks for more high nutrient recipes.

If you’ve found this information useful I’d appreciate your support (at no extra cost to you!) – please check out my online store for your health foods, supplements, kitchen items and beauty product purchases. Affiliate sales through my online store go towards maintaining the website, funding travel to interviews and purchasing all the lovely foods for my free online recipes. You’ll find these items in the “Shop with us” drop down menu on my homepage.

 Please don’t forget antihistamine, pain killing foods can still hurt us, so please always check with your doctor before adding new foods to your diet. 

Optimum Nutrition, Recipes

New Year Antihistamine Detox Jui-cie

No Comments 03 January 2014

antihistamine juice

 You know that perennial hot topic: juices vs. smoothies?

My new big thing this year is hedging my bets with what I’m calling a jui-cie – a juice/smoothie combo.

Those of you who follow my blog will have noticed pictures of me eating strawberries popping up here and there, as well as stories of oranges, grapefruits, all kinds of nuts and cacao – how? I’m getting ready to share it all with you – and this is a HUGE part of the recovery process for me – what I’ve been calling breakfast for the last few months: a super duper antihistamine and anti-inflammatory packed juicie.

What I’ll do is juice together all the really fibrous veggies and fruits (supposedly so I’m better able to absorb the vitamins) and then blend in handful after handful of super dark green leafy stuff – you know, the kind you know your body is gasping for.

I can actually feel the inflammation dissipate a few hours after having my daily infusion – no joke!

Fret not about the juices vs. smoothie thing – I’ve asked another expert to weigh in on it for us. I’ll be sharing my interview with the Juice Lady Cherie Calbom – who has appeared on Oprah and collaborated with Dr Oz – this coming week. We get into all kinds of good stuff about detoxing, emotional healing and much more!

Don’t miss it – sign up to my newsletter! 

I haven’t done my usual breakdown of benefits for this juice because every single ingredient is an antihistamine or anti-inflammatory (some are both). You’ll find more antihistamine and anti-inflammatory foods and recipes in the Anti-Cookbooks (regular and paleo). 

BIG GREENIE (low oxalate)

Juice

2 large apples

1 head broccoli

1 large cucumber

Blend

1 handful watercress

2 handfuls romaine

1 inch cube ginger

1 level teaspoon spirulina

2 handfuls arugula

Join my mailing list for more recipes and to be the first to know when registration for my low histamine webinar opens!

Take a peek at my low histamine and antihistamine cookbooks for more high nutrient recipes.

If you’ve found this information useful I’d appreciate your support (at no extra cost to you!) – please check out my online store for your health foods, supplements, kitchen items and beauty product purchases. Affiliate sales through my online store go towards maintaining the website, funding travel to interviews and purchasing all the lovely foods for my free online recipes. You’ll find these items in the “Shop with us” drop down menu on my homepage.

 Please don’t forget antihistamine, pain killing foods can still hurt us, so please always check with your doctor before adding new foods to your diet. 

Recipes

‘Tis the Season for Crumble/Crisp (gluten free, paleo, low oxalate)

No Comments 04 December 2013

low histamine mango crumble

Are you getting a little down about your Christmas options?

Don’t fall into the traps I did years ago…

It really doesn’t have to be feast or famine (so to speak). It’s totally realistic to plan out a survival strategy for the holidays: pre-festivities detox, munching plan for the main events and a recovery plan so there’s still room in your (histamine) bucket for New Year’s eve!

Soooooo…here’s a little something I whipped up that I’ll definitely be serving up for my low histamine Christmas.

Crumbles/crisps have never really been my thang. They’re too sickly sweet, usually topped with even more sugar (ice cream), and I invariably walked away from the dinner table with a treacly rock in my stomach, slowly working its indigestive charms till I managed to score some tums.

Oh what fun!

But this year I plan neither to spend the festivities nursing a warm cup of ginger infused water while half heartedly trying to assure friends that the drool on my chin is just a part of the healing process, nor will I spend the 26th-2nd riding the porcelain express.

And so my lovely little low histamine dessert with antihistamine and anti-inflammatory ingredients (as always!) is just what I need to keep me from lashing out, tourrettes-like into something that’s going to mess with my zen vibe.

Here’s the benefits breakdown: 

Some mangoes possess antihistaminic properties (depending on variety) but all are anti-inflammatory [1].

Ginger is as potent an H2 receptor blocker as Zantac (prescribed for stomach acid) and is also an H1 blocker (like Claritin for example) [2].

Some varieties of sorghum flour are anti-inflammatory [3].

Almonds are highly anti-inflammatory [4] and high in beneficial nutrients like vitamin E.

Coconut is anti-inflammatory and also a pain killer [5].

Dates are anti-inflammatory, but listed as high histamine on some lists. I eat them.

You’ll find more antihistamine and anti-inflammatory foods as well as a thorough nutrient breakdown in all recipes in the Anti-Cookbooks (regular and paleo)

Mango Crumble w/Ginger

Prep Time: 10 | Cook Time: 20-40  | Servings: 2 | Difficulty: Easy

Ingredients:

1 mango, sliced
1/2 tbsp grated ginger
2 tbsp lime/lemon/lemon basil
1 cup sorghum flour
1/2 cup almond/oat flour (coconut for low oxalate*)
1/2 cup coconut oil (or your choice of oil)
1/4 cup dates or 1/2 cup coconut sugar
raw vanilla
pinch salt

Optional
Coconut cream

Directions:

Pre-heat your oven to 180C/350F.

Place your sliced mango in a small to medium pot. Splash with some water, then add the ginger, lime/lemon and a pinch of salt.

Cover and cook on low heat till tender (about 10 minutes).

Meanwhile, in a food processor combine the sorghum with the almond/oat flour. If you want to go lower oxalate, coconut flour is a great alternative – but you’ll need something to give a bit of texture and binding. A few sunflower seeds, an egg/s or some apple puree.

Then toss in the dates/coconut sugar, oil, raw vanilla and a pinch of salt. To use less oil – sub 1/4 cup pureed apple for the coconut.

Into a small baking dish (or oven proof glasses) spoon the mango and then top with the flour.

Bake at 180C/350F for 20-30 minutes, until the crumbly layer is nice and golden.

Serve with coconut cream (optional).

 Please don’t forget antihistamine, pain killing foods can still hurt us, so please always check with your doctor before adding new foods to your diet. 

Join my mailing list for more recipes and to be the first to know when registration for my low histamine webinar opens. 

Take a peek at my low histamine and antihistamine cookbooks for more high nutrient recipes.

If you’ve found this information useful I’d appreciate your support (at no extra cost to you!) – please check out my online store for your health foods, supplements, kitchen items and beauty product purchases. Affiliate sales through my online store go towards maintaining the website, funding travel to interviews and purchasing all the lovely foods for my free online recipes. You’ll find these items in the “Shop with us” drop down menu on my homepage.

——-REFERENCES——–

[1-5] The Anti-Cookbook

Recipes

The Low Histamine Thanksgiving Part 2 (pie!)

1 Comment 19 November 2013

Don’t forget to check out part 1 of this Thanksgiving meal

smashed jerusalem artichokes

Smashed Jerusalem Artichokes w/Healing Herbs

Ingredients

4-8 cups scrubbed or peeled jerusalem artichokes, chopped

4 medium shallots or 2 onions, chopped

thyme, to taste

basil, to taste

garlic, to taste

olive oil

Preparation

Parboil the chokes.

Meanwhile, sauté the shallots or onions, thyme, garlic and basil.

Toss in the jerusalem artichokes and sauté for a few more minutes.

Withdraw from the heat and use either a potato masher or a pestle and mortar (as I did) to lightly smash the potatoes.

low histamine butternut squash pie

Butternut Squash Pie

I was never a baking aficionado. By the time I got stuck into cooking (I used to pride myself on barely knowing how to boil an egg), I was already on the low grain bandwagon, before committing to pretty much going almost totally grain free (and certainly totally gluten free). So for something as precious as the crust of your Thanksgiving pie, I’m sending you to an expert – Gluten Free Girl. Her 3, 2, 1 pastry method is pretty fool proof - with a few caveats!

Or you could make your own paleo crust…

My instinct is always to make raw pies. They’re healthy and delicious – requiring no eggs. Problem is, they’re an acquired taste, and it’s unlikely that families will greet them with anything but suspicion on Thanksgiving.

My second personal preference is to go flour-free, but I recognise that most people are still eating it, and if going flour-free, the pie would best be left to firm up overnight in the fridge. Though I’m always talking about not eating leftovers, I will eat pretty much most things that were cooked that day. For me 18 hours is where it gets a little dicey…

I really recommend trying this recipe a few days in advance (maybe put together a mini pie, or freeze it for a later date), as you don’t want to ruin your Thanksgiving if something goes wrong.

The ingredients of this pie are antihistamine, anti-inflammatory, low oxalate and paleo.

Creamy coconut is easy to make at home. Crack open a mature coconut. Chop it up into smaller bits and then toss into a powerful blender (I use a Vitamix) with about a cup of water. Buzz and then strain in a nut milk bag.

Pour into a bowl and allow to settle somewhere cool. In about an hour (less if it’s cold), you’ll see that the really creamy stuff has risen to the top. Scoop up as much as you can. The layer that forms again once you’ve scooped it all up is also great, but more watery.

For the sugar I chose to use my favourite new find – Coconom. This great stuff has added organic juiced ginger, tamarind and turmeric.

LOVE it!

If you can’t find it in your area, I would try a little freshly (finely) grated ginger and turmeric. Again, please try this recipe ahead of time…

Ingredients

1 medium butternut squash, peeled/seeded and oven roasted till soft

1/4 cup (creamy) coconut milk

2 eggs (I used duck eggs but you can use what you like)

1/2 cup sorghum flour (paleo, medium oxalate)

1/2 cup coconut sugar (I used Coconom Turmeric & Tamarind)

fresh raw vanilla, to taste (as tolerated)

Preparation

In a medium bowl mix the roasted butternut squash, creamy coconut, eggs, flour, sugar and vanilla.

Pour into your pie shell and bake at 360F/180C till firm, but cooked through. Should take between 45mins and an hour, depending on your oven.

Hope you enjoy the recipes!

Don’t forget to…

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Join my mailing list for more recipes, to be the first to know when registration for my low histamine webinar opens, and for a 10% discount on my books!

Take a peek at my low histamine and antihistamine cookbooks for more high nutrient recipes.

Recipes

The Low Histamine Thanksgiving (paleo, low oxalate, gluten free)

2 Comments 12 November 2013

low histamine thanksgiving

As those of you who checked out my histamine intolerance supplements video will know, I sound American, but not so much so that you can’t tell I’m not actually from the states.

It has definitely confused people over the years.

My phonetically accurate pronunciation of Arkansas (Ar-Kan-Zas) caught my supervising editor at CNN’s political unit in DC by surprise. I had been successfully blending in till that point – my accent was that strong.

I am however not American, in the slightest. My background is European/Mid Eastern and I grew up in Spain.

But some of my happiest family meals took place in Washington DC with my very favourite third cousin/auntie/surrogate mom, HM, who taught me to love Thanksgiving. A wonderful cook, homemaker, mother and yoga enthusiast (who took me to my first ever ashtanga class), HM’s Thanksgivings can’t be topped – but I certainly had fun trying!

Sadly, having spent three hours cooking – the alternately overcast and blindingly sunny weather foiled my efforts to photograph what was a really lovely lunch…

My Thanksgiving Menu

Low histamine, low oxalate, paleo, gluten free, dairy free

Roast Duck w/Rosemary Garlic Jus

Juicy Stuffing (from the upcoming Get Juicy Cookbook)

Secret Cranberry Sauce

Smashed Jerusalem Artichokes w/Healing Herbs

Gluten free Antihistamine & Anti-inflammatory Butternut Squash Pie (Dairy Free)

It’s quite a mouthful, so I’ve decided to split the recipe into two to make it more manageable! Part two will be out in just a few days, in plenty of time to head to the supermarket for Thanksgiving!

Why duck?

Well, I cooked Thanksgiving lunch in early November, somewhat on the spur of the moment, and I live with a vegetarian.

A butterball turkey for one person seemed inadvisable. Aside from that, I’m a big duck fan!

I chose Jerusalem artichokes for their pre-biotic and anti-inflammatory properties [1] (as well as flavour of course!) and butternut squash for dessert because pumpkin appears on some lists as high histamine, while butternut squash is not only low histamine, but also possesses antihistamine and anti-inflammatory properties [2]. I chose to stick with traditional cranberry because I’ve never had a problem with it and it doesn’t appear on most lists. You could easily go for blueberry or apple for this recipe – both would be delicious. Cranberries possess many anti-inflammatory properties [3].

I went a little crazy with a new ingredient – Coconom ginger coconut sugar and Coconom tamarind turmeric coconut sugar. WOW. They’re basically raw coconut sugar with freshly squeezed organic juices of ginger, tamarind and turmeric!

There’s an incredible antihistamine and anti-inflammatory ice-cream coming up soon made with these – absolutely blew me away!! Drooling again thinking about it…don’t forget to sign up to my mailing list to make sure you don’t miss it!

But, as always, I’m getting ahead of myself.

Down to business…

low histamine thanksgiving duck

Roast Duck w/Rosemary Garlic Jus and Juicy Stuffing 

Serves 2

Inspiration for this recipe from the Gressingham duck folks here in the UK. 

Ingredients

1 duck

1 head garlic, chopped in half

handful rosemary sprigs

olive oil

salt and pepper

1-2 tbsp coconut nectar (optional)

Preparation

Pre-heat the oven to 200C/390F.

Pat the duck dry. Remove the giblets if still inside. Pierce the back legs a few times with a fork, on each side.

Place the duck on a baking tray. Spoon on the coconut nectar (if using) followed by a drizzle of olive oil.

Add the garlic to the tray, then sprinkle everything with rosemary, pepper and salt.

Bake for 45 minutes, basting along the way.

I then turned mine around and baked for another 45 minutes. You’ll have to check your cooking time according to the weight of your duck. There’s more info and a great tutorial here. You’ll know the duck is ready if, when pierced, the juices run clear.

Remove from the oven and allow to sit for 10 – 20 minutes.

Juicy Stuffing

Serves 2

This recipe is from the upcoming Get Juicy book – a collection of antihistamine and anti-inflammatory juicing leftover recipes. Please use your judgement in adjusting this recipe – in the book I use it as a salad crouton recipe – but I loved it as stuffing!

Ingredients

1 head Broccoli

2 zucchini

1 cup arugula/rocket

2 carrots (omit if very low oxalate)

1 onion or large shallot, chopped

1 clove garlic

thyme

basil

rosemary

nigella sativa seeds

1/2 cup Flour (I use rice or chickpea – try sorghum for low oxalate and paleo)

2 eggs (or one duck egg – many with egg allergies can tolerate them but please check with your doctor)

4 tbsp olive oil

Preparation

Juice together…

Broccoli

Zucchini

Arugula/rocket

Carrot (use cucumber if low oxalate)

Then…

Collect the roughage from the broccoli, arugula, carrot and zucchini juice.

Saute the onion/shallot, garlic, thyme, basil and nigella till fragrant. Add in the juice roughage.

Tip into a baking dish, add in the eggs, flour and oil. Mix. Drizzle with a bit of duck fat/jus and bake at 180C/380F for about 30 minutes.

 

low histamine anti inflammatory cranberry sauce

Cranberry Sauce

Serves 2

Ingredients

1 cup fresh or frozen cranberries

1/4 cup ginger coconut sugar (I used Coconom – you can use coconut sugar and a little fresh grated ginger)

1/4 cup water

squeeze of fresh lemon

1-2 tbsp duck fat (optional – really incredibly tasty though!)

Preparation

Place the cranberries in a small pot with the water. Bring to the boil.

Lower to a simmer and add in the coconut sugar (and grated ginger if using), stir till dissolved. (I recommend using the ginger – gives it extra zing!)

Squeeze in the lemon. The mixture should start firming up now.

Optional – stir in a little duck fat/jus from your roasting duck (I highly recommend this!)

Be sure not to miss part two – sign up to my mailing list (more recipes and research too)! 

And don’t forget to check out the Anti-Cookbooks (Paleo and regular) for a six page list of antihistamine and anti-inflammatory foods…

——-REFERENCES——

[1] The Anti-Cookbook

[2] The Anti-Cookbook

[3] http://www.cranberryinstitute.org/news/PR/PR100605.htm

WHAT FOLKS ARE SAYING …

Within two days of changing my diet…I was out of bed with more energy than I had had in months (without the use of steroids). My chronic flushing was dramatically reduced and my itching disappeared. I am so thankful that I read your inspiring e-book (The Anti-Cookbook).VS

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